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Daily Polls

Poll From: 05/11/2013

Swag Bucks are awarded for participating in the current Daily Poll only.See Previous Polls

Do you say you Could care less or Couldn't care less? Submitted By swag_h9344270, BC
Could care less.
Couldn't care less.
Both.
I'm not familiar with or do not use this phrase.
Vote
Comment on this poll
gbondsjox
on 05/06/14
i dont understand the poll and i dont care
Loliland
on 05/11/13
KaraParaSwag liked this  
This poll is just absurd. If you said you could care less, that means you're capable of caring less; couldn't care less means you're incapable of caring less than you already do. Why is this even a poll?
HannahMWolff
on 05/28/13
exactly, people can be so stupid
raySunshine
on 05/12/13
It shows how many people today are illiterate. It is actually very enlightening. Nice poll.
Nikki819
on 05/11/13
tigerlingh and 4 others liked this  
The correct idiom is "I could care less." YES, the meaning is opposite, but such is the case with many idioms (meaning something other than what would be literally inferred). Try a swag search. You'll see.
Chip269
on 05/13/13
johnwx69 liked this  
gee, that sure is a lot of comments up there!

lol
stuckey24
on 05/11/13
KaraParaSwag and 1 others liked this  
This is not an idiom. An idiom is a form of figurative language in which you use an unrelated statement to describe something. Example: It's raining cats or dogs.
The phrase: I couldn't care less means exactly what you are saying. You care so little about something that it is impossible to care any less about it. To say "I could care less" means that you do have some feeling about something, and it is possible to care less about it.

For what it's worth... I'm an American English teacher. :)
Nikki819
on 05/13/13
That is one narrow definition of the term "idiom." Merriam-Webster, and my college linguistics professors, seem to have a much broader definition than you. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/idiom?show=0&t=1368429398
25Shadow75
on 05/11/13
Who you calling an Idiom??.... Are you my old 3rd Grade teacher??
Cmarce439
on 05/11/13
It's I couldn't care less. maybe you should do another swag search :P
codewritinfool
on 05/11/13
anklebreaker10 liked this  
An internet search does not make it true. "I could care less" means you care somewhat. If you could care less, why don't you just do it? "I couldn't care less" means "I could not care less" which says you have not a shred of caring remaining.

"I couldn't care less" is correct.
Nikki819
on 05/13/13
leiramelody liked this  
You are correct, an internet search means absolutely nothing if your source is not reputable. If, however, your source is a trusted dictionary of idioms that states both are correct, then perhaps I am on to something and we should all quit bickering since we're ALL right.
ActionCat2000
on 05/11/13
You are incorrect. It says what it means, like many idioms. Just because people use it incorrectly--hence a search would turn it up, because it's out there--doesn't mean it is right.
Nikki819
on 05/13/13
The definition of an idiom, to quote Merriam-Webster would disagree with you:

an expression in the usage of a language that is peculiar to itself either grammatically (as no, it wasn't me) or in having a meaning that cannot be derived from the conjoined meanings of its elements

So, by definition, an idiom does not generally say what it means. "by the skin of my teeth" "apple of my eye" etc. etc.
Patrick1369
on 05/11/13
leeber219 and 4 others liked this  
I couldn't care less means I care so little, it is impossible for me to care any less.
demonictalent
on 05/11/13
Actually, the correct term is "Couldn't care less" started in the UK, made it over to the U.S, and us idiots changed it because we are just that way. both are "correct", but "couldn't care less" is the actual correct way to say it. Both mean the same.
bluela
on 05/11/13
BubbleNymph liked this  
I see where you're all reading this (World Wide Words), but they aren't actually saying that every American uses the incorrect phrase. They're saying *only* Americans use the incorrect phrase, and it might be in a sarcastic way or have something to do with Yiddish or whatever. But saying *only* Americans do it in no way means ALL Americans do it. I am an American here to say I don't and never have. And nearly everyone I went to school with would have been embarrassed and ashamed to do it either. I went to a school where you were looked down upon when you didn't get good grades. It was slightly offset by athleticism and popularity, but not much. There was still academic snobbery no matter what else you did well.
marycaryne
on 05/11/13
sebreilly and 5 others liked this  
A swag search turning up a result with "could care less" does NOT make it correct. "Could care less" is a very recent saying (within the last 60 years) and came about with the INCORRECT usage of "couldn't care less." Instead of believing everything you read on the internet (i.e. a swag search), it is actually better to pay attention to your English and grammar class.
maryspost
on 05/11/13
Jenniferocks and 1 others liked this  
you believe everything you read on the internet don't ya...........lol - and to top it off, swag search? think about the words, what do they mean, when you don't care, you are not really into idioms, you are saying I DON"T CARE! lol
robbyrwf
on 05/11/13
youre wrong.
Lordness
on 05/11/13
nice apostophe.
superkoop
on 05/11/13
Nikki819 and 4 others liked this  
The original phrase was european, meaning "I couldn't care less." Americans, including myself, changed it to say "I could care less." Essentially we made the phrase sarcastic, similar to the phrase "tell me about it." I generally don't use this phrase though because it seems confusing.
stuckey24
on 05/11/13
I do not think Americans (intentionally) use it "sarcastically." I think many Americans just don't think about how they are saying it, or they would say it correctly. It simply doesn't make since to say "I could care less."
BTW... I'm American, and I say "I couldn't care less" - to mean exactly what I'm saying. I could care so little about something that it would be impossible to care anymore about it.
Alex5445
on 05/11/13
KaraParaSwag and 6 others liked this  
No, "Americans" didn't change it to anything. People who misunderstood or who just can't seem to quite grasp the actual meaning are the ones who've botched it to the point that entirely too many people think "could care less" is actually correct. The only way that statement is correct is if, in fact, you actually COULD care less than you already do - which has a different meaning than the proper statement of "couldn't care less". Additionally, there is nothing "sarcastic" in the incorrect usage of this phrase. Ignorance may have been the term you were looking for. Please don't attempt to speak for all Americans - not all of us are idiots.
ActionCat2000
on 05/11/13
cworland and 1 others liked this  
This is a good explanation and good reasoning for not using it. I have always said "couldn't", which is clear, and although I personally appreciate sarcasm, saying "could" in this instance makes a person look more ignorant than sarcastic.
bluela
on 05/11/13
stuckey24 and 2 others liked this  
Not all Americans did this. I am American and my parents are American, and we all say "couldn't care less." We don't say it sarcastically, either. Generally, we say it in an argument. For example: "I couldn't care less if you didn't know who it was! There's no excuse! You should have thought about what you were saying!"
Kayelyn75
on 05/11/13
felicitations and 9 others liked this  
I guess you missed that day in school. It is "I COULDN'T care less"... COULDN'T. This, along with the nonsense of not being able tot ell the difference between "to" and "too" nor "you're" and "you're" (could even throw in "yore", but I doubt the kids would get it!)... and even "there", "their" and "they're"... Dumbing down our education. Very sad, indeed.
ChelseBrun
on 05/11/13
brafitter and 3 others liked this  
Said a boy to his teacher one day "Wright has not written 'rite' right, I say." And the teacher replied as the blunderor she eyed: "Right. Wright, write 'rite' right, right away!"
HannahMWolff
on 05/28/13
took me a second to understand lol
bluela
on 05/11/13
Swagster75 liked this  
I'll admit I occasionally miss a "to" when proofreading, and spell check certainly never catches it. If the keyboard doesn't get the "oo" when you first type, it's hard to see when you're skimming for errors. It's always best to read aloud from start to finish, and usually you catch every error that way. I tend to give people a little more benefit of the doubt with the to/too situation. It's the only one that can really be an honest typo.
Maiasaura2001
on 05/11/13
felicitations liked this  
If you (collective you) make an honest typo, that is of course to be forgiven...but all too many people anymore don't KNOW that it's supposed to be "too" and not "to". To/too and you're/your-- nobody knows nor cares the difference anymore :(
Arsenalfan96
on 05/11/13
felicitations and 33 others liked this  
No it isn't. Once again, you Americans think YOU'RE the ones in the right, :P

http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/g09.html
HannahMWolff
on 05/28/13
cuz we are
Nikki819
on 05/12/13
I didn't even use the word "you're" (correctly or incorrectly) so I'm not sure how this debate started up. I was writing from an American perspective as, I live in America. I am sorry for not considering that other English speaking countries may use the idiom differently.

And to those assuming those of us saying "I could care less" are incapable of proper English, I am a licensed ESL teacher and work as a freelance editor. Recognizing an idiom as just that, an idiom, is apparently a lost art.
HannahMWolff
on 05/28/13
you didn't say you're, Arsenalfen said it, "you Americans think YOU'RE the ones right"
bluela
on 05/11/13
JBrothers and 5 others liked this  
Excuse me, but I am American, and I use the phrase correctly (if I use it at all). Don't make rude presumptions based on a few people. That's called prejudice and bigotry. As much as I hate incorrect usage of English, I hate bigotry and prejudice much more. The poll results clearly show a majority here choose the correct phrase.
bkbeltrame
on 05/11/13
zenzen and 2 others liked this  
Americans are so sensitive these days...
lizbethbear
on 05/11/13
JBrothers and 5 others liked this  
I am sick and tired of everyone lumping Americans all together. I do NOT say "I could care less" I say and have always said and HEARD from those around me "I couldn't care less", saying it the other way just doesn't make sense.
ChelseBrun
on 05/11/13
Yeah, no kidding!
I've heard people try to say that America isn't a melting pot but a salad bowl, but I would like to hear those people explain how I came to be Scot, English, Bohemian, Norwegian, Swede, Dane, Finn, German, and even a tad English and French? And how are my cousins Hispanic, Chinese, Filipino, African, and Mayan?
It's a melting pot! BUT we're not all the same! It's a melting pot where not all the metal has melted yet:-)
HannahMWolff
on 05/28/13
you said English twice
ZeeMAD1
on 05/11/13
BubbyBobble and 1 others liked this  
Melting pot would suggest that America is the same everywhere and it is not. It's a salad bowl. Every part of the country is different and unique.
RowenaRavenclaw
on 05/11/13
beccasynthetic and 2 others liked this  
We changed it to sarcasm because for a lot of us, it's a second language. Chill out, dude. Don't be hating.
HannahMWolff
on 05/28/13
Who says its a second language? For me it's a first language.
rosesayer
on 05/11/13
beccasynthetic and 17 others liked this  
I am an American and I agree with you. "Couldn't care less" is correct.
HannahMWolff
on 05/28/13
I use could care less, but couldn't care less is grammatically correct.
ArusDaryl
on 05/11/13
sammy0354 and 23 others liked this  
*YOUR

At least, that's how we say it in America.


Source: Facebook users
FashionistaGeek
on 05/13/13
I dearly hope you are being sarcastic. (as I sense you might be from sourcing facebook users) However, "your" is possessive while"you're" indicates "you are." Again, I'm fairly certain you were being sarcastic, but just in case, there it is.
Jade4142
on 05/11/13
leiramelody liked this  
you - the person
your - what belongs to or os a characteristic of you
you're - you are

This moment of grammar lesson brought to you by a holder of a BA in English, a former teacher, and a published writer, One million Facebook users sharing the same belief are not necessarily right.
ZeeMAD1
on 05/11/13
Nice.
cworland
on 05/11/13
The correct word would be you're, the contraction for you are. Your is the possessive of you. I do hate that you choose to make the rest of us Americans appear ignorant.
branewurms
on 05/11/13
branewurms
on 05/11/13
sammy0354 and 3 others liked this  
OH MY GOD, PEOPLE. I just read through the comments. The world is made of idiots and satire is dead.
jessb86
on 05/11/13
you're ( you are ) was right..
OwlRose
on 05/11/13
Chip269 liked this  
Nope, it's you're. It's the contraction for "you are" as in "Americans think you are the ones."
eddiemason21
on 05/11/13
Chip269 liked this  
He was right. It is You're.
Maiasaura2001
on 05/11/13
Chip269 liked this  
Nope. Arsenalfan is correct. I'm American. You are wrong. YOU'RE is a contraction of YOU ARE. How you think we say it in America makes us look ignorant in the extreme.
dbthespian
on 05/11/13
Chip269 and 1 others liked this  
Isn't it funny when someone tries to correct someone else's already correct grammar and tells them the wrong way to say something.
crankycow
on 05/11/13
*You're mean your are. Your is possessive. BTW we say it the same no matter how it's spelled.
ChelseBrun
on 05/11/13
Depends on where you're from. Using the International Phonetic Alphabet (the IPA) in a normal sentence I pronounce your jr, and you're j?r. On their own, your is jor and you're j?r.
ChelseBrun
on 05/11/13
Oops, the comment section doesn't like the shwa. The question mark is suppose to be an upside-down e.
MECH72
on 05/11/13
jessb86 and 2 others liked this  
FAIL haha!!

Canadians for the win!
MarkFirehaven
on 05/11/13
arifshaw11 and 2 others liked this  
Claim victory all you want, in the end, Canada is still America's hat.
arifshaw11
on 05/11/13
Lol u wish. You guys are just mad that u aren't as good and never will be
jessb86
on 05/11/13
N0567 liked this  
America is Canada's underwear..
FarrahnsMom
on 05/11/13
JennaLau and 5 others liked this  
"You're" joking right???? Go back to school ArusDaryl ......This has nothing to do with America!!
"You're" making your fellow Americans look stupid if you say that!!!!

YOUR is something that belongs to someone ....Bring your money to the store.
YOU'RE is actually two words: YOU ARE .. You are welcome. or....YOU'RE WELCOME.

In the end it's called a contraction! Did you sleep through this grammar lesson LOL
branewurms
on 05/11/13
WHOOSH.
aacramer
on 05/11/13
Batmantha and 1 others liked this  
Did you sleep through sarcasm detection 101? ArusDaryl's source was "Facebook users". Meaning nobody on facebook can spell. Jokes, man. They go over too many people's heads.
Chip269
on 05/13/13
is sarcasm detection a required course these days??? IT IS?!?!?

That is just sad.
inkygurl42
on 05/11/13
Chip269 and 5 others liked this  
nope, Arsenalfan96 spelled it correctly to as what he is saying ....read it again...

You American's think YOU ARE = You're

not Your
codewritinfool
on 05/11/13
zenzen liked this  
Learn to use an apostrophe before you correct others.
DawnieWawnie
on 05/11/13
Chip269 and 8 others liked this  
WRONGGGGGG.....It's YOU'RE, As in ,YOU ARE..... You're making us look bad....
HannahMWolff
on 05/28/13
Haha, laughed myself off the chair
branewurms
on 05/11/13
WHOOSH.
ChelseBrun
on 05/11/13
Yes, but it seems to me that many young Americans wright it wrong anyway. It drives me crazy, but the posessive your unfortunately seems to be a very common substitute for the contraction you're.
rhomcy
on 05/11/13
NewMomma2011 and 5 others liked this  
write?
MelATC14
on 05/11/13
sammy0354 and 8 others liked this  
You're not helping *facepalm*
DonnaMK
on 05/11/13
leiramelody and 12 others liked this  
You're all giving me a really good laugh today, anyway! :D (Does that make me a bad person?) ;)
Krovyeyu
on 05/11/13
naydana liked this  
I don't know, I'm laughing too hard to tell.....Internet wars get you nowhere!
rosesayer
on 05/11/13
G8kpr3000 and 11 others liked this  
Comment Under Review
prismcat
on 05/11/13
FashionistaGeek and 6 others liked this  
Excuse me?!?! Those contractions are taught in every elementary/middle school in the country. Just because some people get lazy about they're doesn't mean it isn't taught. And we can't blame the teachers all the time either. The ultimate responsibility for a child's education rests with the parents. We aren't a country of idiots, we're a country of lazy parents. Not to mention you appear stupid criticizing something like contractions when you leave the "r" off of country; learn how to proofread what you type. Remove the beam from your own eye before pointing out the splinter in someone else's eye.
Tourmaline
on 05/11/13
I never heard of contractions in school
cworland
on 05/11/13
RenaeS and 1 others liked this  
That isn't a double negative. A double negative would be something such as "she isn't not going" which would actually mean that she is going.
nyneelie
on 05/11/13
Prism, double negative sentences are wrong too. (doesn't and isn't contractions of does not and is not)
;)
prismcat
on 05/11/13
Swagster75 and 1 others liked this  
And here I am looking stupid because I didn't catch the extra word in my second sentence..."they're" shouldn't be there. Geesh...
egirlegirl
on 05/11/13
daliamohamed1 and 3 others liked this  
Don't you mean "Americans?" That is the plural form of American. The way you wrote it, you implied either that something belongs to the Americans or that you meant to say "American is."
maryspost
on 05/11/13
Shareleann liked this  
I had a teacher once write to me and put the state abbreviation as AK............but I was in Arkansas at the time.......it got here probably due to the zip code, but really? AK, AR, AZ..........go learn them people, don't embarrass yourself.
DeDe1961
on 05/11/13
lizbethbear and 3 others liked this  
Comment Under Review
lizbethbear
on 05/11/13
No, what was uncalled for was what rosesayer said, in its entirety.
maryspost
on 05/11/13
pbjplzmom liked this  
that one was not even called for, if you can't tell the difference between a typo and bad grammar, then you need to read up a bit as well.
Muchablige
on 05/11/13
lol
llf49
on 05/11/13
Shareleann and 2 others liked this  
Sadly, you are right! I see this all the time in emails, etc., and just cringe! After being in the secretarial field most of my working life, I can spot the mistakes a mile off. I always wonder if they're coming from "smart phones" that have chosen the words or people are really that illiterate.
HannahMWolff
on 05/28/13
my guess is illiterate and just don't care
TheQueenKasey
on 05/11/13
ect.
maryspost
on 05/11/13
HansieDZ liked this  
agggghh people do that too, ect..........(CRINGE) lol
G8kpr3000
on 05/11/13
hblack4d and 10 others liked this  
You have no idea how pleased I am to see you type etc. and not ect
phyllis63
on 05/11/13
pbjplzmom and 5 others liked this  
This American does!
archan008
on 05/24/13
nice
Troll420
on 05/16/13
I say both.
johnwx69
on 05/14/13
DoctorWhoCrazy liked this  
I say both. Couldn't care less means that you don't care at all. Could care less means that you do care, but you don't have to.
sammy0354
on 05/13/13
Who care's? I like Spanish a lot better. I'm sorry I am not an English major or minor for that fact. I have horrible dyslexia, and writing on paper is a hard task. For all you people over petty arguments over your and you're, I don't think that is what is putting the money in your hand. Get over it people have different strengths.
RobertjohnA
on 05/13/13
"Couldn't care less". Must be less rude ways of putting it
Swagmistress135
on 05/12/13
Nikki819 liked this  
Ha...I think it also tells what part of the states you live in....
Nikki819
on 05/13/13
I agree. It's most likely regional.
Nikki819
on 05/13/13
(I) could(n't) care less.
Inf. It doesn't matter to me. (The less bears the heaviest stress in both versions. Despite the apparent contradiction, either reading of this—both the affirmative and negative—usually have the same meaning. The exception would be in a sentence where the could bears the heaviest stress: I COULD care less, [but I don't.].) Tom: The rain is coming! The carpet will get wet! Mary: I couldn't care less. Bill: I'm going to go in there and tell off the boss? John: I could care less.
See also: care, could, less

could(n't) care less

[one is] unable to care at all; it does not matter at all. John couldn't care less whether he goes to the party or not. I could care less if I live or die.


The idiom dictionary is compiled from the Cambridge International Dictionary of Idioms and the Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms.
Nikki819
on 05/13/13
So we're all right. So let's quit calling 27% of SB users morons incapable of proper English, hmm?
Pogosoup
on 05/12/13
haha
Zigz
on 05/12/13
funny
Koala7
on 05/12/13
nice one
morimunda
on 05/11/13
wolfbranded and 3 others liked this  
The right way is "couldn't" because if you "could" you'd care at least a little bit. :P
MissBlack1
on 05/11/13
it doesn,t matter
shebabie
on 05/11/13
couldnt
shebabie
on 05/11/13
Catlady2012 liked this  
simple
Parmars
on 05/11/13
could care less
RebellYell
on 05/11/13
mickeyfangirl and 5 others liked this  
Everyone who says "could care less, " is an idiot.
youreyes2see
on 05/11/13
remember when pointing finger and saying or pointing out something about another, there are three pointing back at YOU!!!
25Shadow75
on 05/11/13
Oh, You old fuddy duddy, You're just a big stick in the mudd. Fooey on you.
Euddy
on 05/11/13
pyromama and 1 others liked this  
you just said it, you are one too
cashflo58
on 05/11/13
Batmantha and 2 others liked this  
Do you know the definition of the word idiot? But I could care less about you showing how immature you are. Ignorant would have been a much nicer word, but I couldn't care less about your opinion.
mgtheman
on 05/11/13
Nikki819 and 3 others liked this  
Unless they could care less.

For example, I could care less about the swagbuck I get from answering this question. I don't, but I certainly could.
Jazyswag
on 05/11/13
Or well
trishyky
on 05/11/13
tfjparadise liked this  
I don't care. Same thing, stupid poll. I don't care. lol.
Paisam4n
on 05/11/13
yes
ColleenBell
on 05/11/13
vxblanco14 liked this  
I couldn't care less how I say it...lol
drhuggs
on 05/11/13
ColleenBell liked this  
I could care less, but that's if I cared at all.
rylew
on 05/11/13
It's possible I can care less or it's impossible I can care less.
nowsearch
on 05/11/13
terry1905 liked this  
what does the picture have to do with the poll.
Valrhona
on 05/11/13
TikiKrissy and 1 others liked this  
Honey badger don't care.
Ikabeth
on 05/11/13
orange37 and 8 others liked this  
This is actually a pet peeve of mine, "couldn't care less" is the correct way to say it. If you say "could care less" then you're saying you care.
BubbyBobble
on 05/11/13
Batmantha and 7 others liked this  
I use the term "Couldn't care less", because it's the only one that actually makes sense. But I don't nitpick at folks who use "Could care less" instead. I've got better things to do with my life.
love95
on 05/11/13
tfjparadise liked this  
could care less
chippewaa
on 05/11/13
i use them both
shalomnozomi
on 05/11/13
n.n
lilsk8aboi07
on 05/11/13
SixSamuraiYaichi liked this  
I could care less!
katie322
on 05/11/13
I've always said I "could care less"! LOL!
JewelB30
on 05/11/13
cashflo58 and 3 others liked this  
Could care less --- Some people could care less about this poll and stop being hateful over it.
Couldn't care less --- I couldn't care less about this poll.
luckytown
on 05/11/13
Yes!
SHYGYE13
on 05/11/13
GOOD WAY TO LEARN GRAMER
beccasynthetic
on 05/11/13
Gramer doe
luckytown
on 05/11/13
Grammar
luckytown
on 05/11/13
If you say "I could care less," you actually mean you care a lot - because you could care less than you care now.
BobboTheMighty
on 05/11/13
I say both because I don't care, but to honestly say that to say 'could care less' means you still care a bit is completely incorrect. In this statement, Care means to worry and Less means 'little to none' or sometimes 'without.' I think everybody is forgetting the none and without factor with Less. 'I could care less' or 'I couldn't care less' means the same thing, and to argue English because you have a PhD really means nothing because it is really just based in translations: Ich konnte weniger Pflege oder ich konnte nicht weniger kummern?
YoungRL
on 05/11/13
tabzilla and 2 others liked this  
Except they don't mean the same thing.
beccasynthetic
on 05/11/13
Keekz1 and 1 others liked this  
Welcome to the gathering of the grammar Nazis.
Looking4SBs
on 05/11/13
terjaq liked this  
I never use the phrase. If I really don't care about something, I say "I don't care". It's as simple as that.
leeber219
on 05/11/13
Haha I say "I could care less" because it's what my mom always said. But I have used "couldn't" before... Makes more sense to say could not care less because it means you've hit rock bottom on your care scale... I guess "could" just sounds better? Who knows, who cares... I know I could care less ;)
ZoeFaythe
on 05/11/13
BubbyBobble and 2 others liked this  
Could care less means you actually care, even if it's just a little bit.
GretchenF
on 05/11/13
Ha! ha! I can't believe the comments today. Its amazing how a simple poll can start a war. Back to the poll itself, I chose "Both" because I think I use both.
BTW Swag_h344270,BC congratulations on the 100 swagbucks!
CStove
on 05/11/13
YoungRL and 5 others liked this  
Could care less makes no sense and it implies that you do have some care. Change it, people!
RickZombie
on 05/11/13
BubbyBobble and 1 others liked this  
I use "I don't give a sh*t."
pointe4Jesus
on 05/11/13
KewaneeKid and 6 others liked this  
Anyone else just scroll down to see the grammar debate?
UnicornAttack13
on 05/11/13
thecoolcat96 liked this  
when you couldn't care less.. you don't care. xD when you say i could care less, it is saying you actually do care :P
msouthard77
on 05/11/13
woah
jazzyswag101
on 05/11/13
weird. :)
stuckey24
on 05/11/13
thecoolcat96 and 2 others liked this  
The phrase: I couldn't care less means exactly what you are saying. You care so little about something that it is impossible to care any less. To say "I could care less" means that you do have some feeling about it, and it is possible to care less about the situation.

It would be silly to say the latter. Most of us are correct (43%).
SunshinePie
on 05/11/13
thecoolcat96 liked this  
Couldn't care less is more insulting...so that's the one I use. ;)

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