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Daily Polls

Today's Poll: 03/27/2015

Swag Bucks are awarded for participating in the current Daily Poll only.See Previous Polls

A New York college student was kicked off a Southwest flight for wearing an offensive shirt. Do you think it was appropriate for Southwest to remove the student from the flight? Submitted By Team Swagbucks, CA
Yes, the airline has a responsibility to its other passengers
No, passengers should be able to wear whatever they want
Other/Undecided (explain in comments)
Vote
Comment on this poll
Vmaestre
on 03/27/15
DizzyAbberation liked this  
FEEDOM OF SPEECH!
Taenamyr
on 03/27/15
Freedom of speech is only in the public sector. It is a private company on their private property, so the kid would need to follow their rules and regulations.
LetaDarnell
on 03/27/15
Freedom of speech doesn't guarantee you can't suffer the consequences, nor does it keep private companies and privately owned sectors from banning certain things.
wicklar1219
on 03/27/15
If it's offensive, can't you just ask them to change their shirt? I'm sure they had luggage with clothing in it.
BuckysMom
on 03/27/15
I think people need to stop being offended over every little thing.
willeewill
on 03/27/15
it's his right to freedom of expression. He paid for his ticket, that's not right
Taenamyr
on 03/27/15
Actaully no. He was on private property so he needed to follow the rules and regulations of the airline or his contract (ticket) becomes null-and-void.
Chesapeakejet
on 03/27/15
They asked him to turn it inside out, change shirts, cover it up, etc. but he steadfastly refused.
Veronica5817
on 03/27/15
Yea and he proceeded to lie to the media about it. Till they had a video of it proving they did ask him. Class act this guy is.
LetaDarnell
on 03/27/15
How 'offensive' are we talking here?
billienj1
on 03/27/15
that depends on what the airline polocy is and wether or not it was posted for passengers can. like wallking into a store with a no shirt no shoes no service polocy posted on door. you expect service you need to follow the guidelines of the company providing the service.
sfrench1124
on 03/27/15
I believe he should have been given the chance to change it, I mean... they could have forced him to buy a shirt in the airport.
myno1fan
on 03/27/15
The question to ask is who gets to decide what is offensive? Where is the line drawn? What if some people decide wearing an Abercrombie shirt is "offensive" because the CEO is such a dirtbag?
Taenamyr
on 03/27/15
An airline is a private company. Freedom of Speech only applies to the public sector. In a private organization and on their private property you need to respect their rules and regulations or you are subject to legal action.
abucs
on 03/27/15
It would be different if they were dirty or they were wearing something that is legally indecent exposure but this doesn't rise to that level.
aedificabantur
on 03/27/15
It depends on what the shirt said.
KatsyFGA
on 03/27/15
It depends on why it was considered offensive. Did it show nakedness? swear words? I'd rather not look at such nor have my kids see/read it. But some people might take offense by religious or patriotic expression; I've heard of people being forbidden from flying the American flag in different places in America because it might offend people. WHAT?!?!? You come to America, you have no right to complain about the flag. So, yeah, it depends on why it was offensive.
Shyrobb
on 03/27/15
LetaDarnell liked this  
I said other. Without knowing what the shirt said I just couldn't give a yes or no answer.
Veronica5817
on 03/27/15
Taenamyr and 3 others liked this  
Its sad that so many people here don't understand what freedom of speach is. " to the United States Constitution prohibits the making of any law respecting an establishment of religion, impeding the free exercise of religion, abridging the freedom of speech, infringing on the freedom of the press, interfering with the right to peaceably assemble or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances.

It has zero to do with a private business. Your free speach ends when you walk into a private business.
cwm747
on 03/27/15
Well said!
Otunj
on 03/27/15
DebraLB liked this  
Thank you for pointing this out. Lots of people interpret Freedom of Speech incorrectly. Natural consequences and a violation of his 1st amendment are not the same thing
KoolDeal
on 03/27/15
It's a shirt. Come on................
DawnsDelights
on 03/27/15
The student offered to change the shirt, per his video and Southwest refused. Southwest has always stunk, their show just hurt them more with their poor customer service, bags lost, over booking, long list of just the worst service ever. So glad I never fly and love road trips. Couldn't pay me to fly, and companies have tried.
http://pix11.com/2015/03/24/man-kicked-off-southwest-flight-over-vulgar-language-on-t-shirt/
GlennJ
on 03/27/15
lolbtw415 liked this  
Actually, per the video at the link you provided, they show the student *refusing* to change his shirt or even cover it up. Even after numerous requests.

My experiences with Southwest haven't been the greatest, but in this case at least they seem vindicated as the reasonable ones. I'm actually a little more likely to use them in the future.
akalinus
on 03/27/15
The TSA is on a power trip.
Les72
on 03/27/15
lznyc212 liked this  
The TSA has absolutely nothing to do with this.
Avongal
on 03/27/15
If it is not stated prior to in writing on the not allowed list then no, if it was then he was wrong to wear it.
kerryv09
on 03/27/15
DawnsDelights and 3 others liked this  
They should have given him the opportunity to change his shirt instead of being kicked off if they felt it was that big of a deal.
Veronica5817
on 03/27/15
They did, Read the articles about it before you speak!!!!!
ikarelm
on 03/27/15
they did.. do your research
Klynn1
on 03/27/15
They did he refused
DawnsDelights
on 03/27/15
wrong, he did offer and they refused to allow him to change. http://pix11.com/2015/03/24/man-kicked-off-southwest-flight-over-vulgar-language-on-t-shirt/
Veronica5817
on 03/27/15
Dawn did you read the whole article. Read further down before you speak. The video of it shows he was asked to change his shirt. The guy lied and the video shows he was asks.
Coors37
on 03/27/15
I know this is answering a question with a question but don't we live in a free country?....
NicoWinch
on 03/27/15
In the name of freedom we always forget to respect others. Nobody should be free to insult other. No exceptions
sammy0354
on 03/27/15
Airlines are privately owned, so this would fall under Southwest own preferences, and is listed on the back of their tickets as well as their website.
krystalrene
on 03/27/15
Depends, what was on the shirt or why was it offensive?
pianogal1955
on 03/27/15
If they asked him to change the shirt, and there was a shirt available, but he refused to change it, then I think they did the right thing to bump him off of the plane. I think that if he was kicked off, that they should give him a refund, and I don't know if they did give a refund or not. The airline has their rules, and they need to be followed. If he refuses to change, he is not following THEIR rules. Yes, in that case, he should have been kicked off.
Snowbaby1969
on 03/27/15
DAJAXTA and 2 others liked this  
Other - I haven't heard about this so I don't know the details. Any private business has the right to enforce a dress code. Many places will allow the customer to bend the rules a little bit. Did they ask him to turn the shirt inside out or offer something else to wear over it. If they did and he refused that is his own choice.
ChocolateSeeker
on 03/27/15
bakaplan79 liked this  
Rather than kicking the student off, why not have them turn the tshirt inside out?
Magick1
on 03/27/15
ImperialR23 and 1 others liked this  
I haven't seen the story, don't know what the offending shirt said/was. But, freedom of speech. If someone wants to show their true colors, then let them. Nothing like having the writing on the wall with what you are dealing with in that person.

Just turn and look the other way. It isn't me wearing it, I am a big girl and can handle it...it might make me mad for a bit, but again, I have seen/hear a lot in my years....move on to the next thing.
chs2x
on 03/27/15
People seem to not understand the idea of freedom of speech. These are freedoms that the government cannot curtail. It does not mean their will be no consequences for this speech that might come from other private individuals or businesses. They too have the freedom to act as they see fit and implement their own policies regarding decency. After all, many schools do this, even public ones, and some high school seniors may be adults legally.
GlennJ
on 03/27/15
psasser and 4 others liked this  
I don't think anyone is arguing that he can't... but I think for Southwest it makes some amount of sense (business, and or common) for them to demand certain minimum standards of dress/decency for their passengers. After all, if the shirt in question does make you mad, you're more likely to associate such experiences with SW.
scmh
on 03/27/15
Good point!
ImperialR23
on 03/27/15
akalinus liked this  
If you see a person with an offensive shirt in a town, do you associate the entire town with the offensive shirt? Saying they would associate it with SW is nonsense. The guy paid for his ticket (which is NOT cheap, by any means) if they have a problem with the way passengers dress, then it is up to them to make a dress code before there is a problem, not make it a problem because it's convenient at the time. A shirt making someone mad is ridiculous in itself, all this ridiculous political correctness....
Veronica5817
on 03/27/15
Im all against political correctness. This has nothing to do with political correctness. This is common Decency, no difference 20 years, 40 years ago or 60 years ago.
shopper66
on 03/27/15
the passenger could have had the option to change his shirt if it was offensive to others
mmoyers
on 03/27/15
From the article I looked at he would have been willing to cover it with his jacket or take it off entirely if they had just politely asked instead of demanding it. I can understand there being rules in places that are heavily crowded with children like Disney World, but on a plane they really should have just said that the shirt may be offensive to some of the other passengers and politely ask him to put his jacket back on (this all happened during a bad weather delay where he took his jacket off revealing the shirt underneath, so they stranded him in a random city).
psasser
on 03/27/15
hungryone and 3 others liked this  
So this poor, poor guy just got his feelings hurt because they didn't ask nicely enough? Please.
shosheni
on 03/27/15
This legitimately made me laugh out loud. Now I can't stop picturing a grown man crying in the corner into his t-shirt. But these are MY feelings! And you hurt them!
Jed98
on 03/27/15
DebraLB liked this  
I can't answer this question without knowing what exactly the student's shirt was.
jacsnews21
on 03/27/15
The reason I am undecided is that it makes a difference who is making the decision. What is offensive to one may not be offensive to another. If airlines like this start making such decisions, then other businesses could begin to make similar decisions that would soon take away individual rights.
KaySlominator
on 03/27/15
DebraLB liked this  
I don't know enough about this to make an informed decision.
hblack4d
on 03/27/15
From what I read, the passenger (per a video) was not complying with the request to remove his shirt or turn it inside out. It is the airline's place of business, and if that is their policy, he should have complied. He did not comply, so he was removed from the flight until he did comply. He has his right to free speech. I do not have to allow it into my business or my home.
Julimonster66
on 03/27/15
Have some respect for others, it's a courteous thing to do
amaasing
on 03/27/15
My first thought when I read the question was "I don't really care". My second thought was "Why was he even allowed on the flight if the airline has such policies?". Which leads to my third thought of "I don't really care".
sujns9
on 03/27/15
Well, these comments are interesting. One person says the passenger offered to change shirts but Southwest would not let him (sounds fishy), and one person says the airline asked him to change or to turn the shirt inside out and the passenger was the one who refused. I don't understand why this simple solution just couldn't have been done.
CindyLouBou
on 03/27/15
everyone have a right to weara what they want as long as they are covered
rolo4276
on 03/27/15
I like the comment about turning the shirt inside out.
dragon54u
on 03/27/15
Had to look it up. I don't think people and children should be involuntarily exposed to obscenities by some jerk who doesn't care about the feelings of others. I remember when people used to dress nicely to travel in public.
Shirtels
on 03/27/15
Until they state a dress policy I believe he should be allowed
DrDwight13
on 03/27/15
steflrb and 1 others liked this  
I would need to see the shirt to make a decision.
AxonJaxon1
on 03/27/15
retiringin2018 liked this  
Perhaps the airline could ask him to change his shirt, turn it inside out, or turn it around & cover with a jacket. If he refuses? Boot him off the plane!
Otunj
on 03/27/15
pineapplupsdown1 liked this  
The Shirt said "Broad F*cking City". He changed into it in the restroom after his flight was diverted. He recorded a video of the gate agent and him discussing it (aka...he knew it was gonna be an issue. Here's the transcript. Freedom of speech prohibits a law being made to abridge him from wearing the shirt, but there are natural consequences.

Gate Agent: ”Can you change the shirt?”
Podolsky: ”Nope.”
Gate Agent: “Can you put the jacket on and leave it on through the flight?”
Podolsky: [unclear]
Gate Agent: “Can you put the shirt on inside out?”
Podolsky: “Nope.”
Gate Agent: “Is there anything you can do not to display the shirt because at this point we can’t allow you to go.”
Podolsky: “I have freedom of speech.”
Gate Agent: “I know you do…”
Podolsky: “Really it’s not bothering anyone.”
Gate Agent: “I can show you in our contract of carriage that you can’t wear any shirts that says offensive…”
Podolsky: “Can we take a
AnnBlair
on 03/27/15
Sheesh!
chs2x
on 03/27/15
Veronica5817 liked this  
Since the passenger was unwilling to comply with the reasonable request of changing his shirt, the airline had the right to remove him from the flight. After all, they are a private company and can decide upon their own policies. I would imagine if one looks at all the fine print on their ticket/boardi pass, etc., there is probably a statement to that effect.
nicoleaf
on 03/27/15
It depends, what was written on the shirt?
Chesapeakejet
on 03/27/15
"Broad F***ing City," of course the asterisks weren't there, it was spelled out.
scmh
on 03/27/15
Seems 59% of the people were against his wearing of the shirt. A College kid wasn't bright enough to realize he wasn't going to be on the plane himself, that families with children would be there and wouldn't find his shirt funny! Sounds like he just wanted to make trouble...funny he called Fox, the conservative station don't you think?
kpixydiva
on 03/27/15
Everyone should have the freedom to say anything they want, including on a shirt. Words are words and you can choose the word you would like to represent you and others may choose to not associate with you for using those words, but everyone has a choice. I was taught that some people do not appreciate offensive language and if I choose to use that language with them I am risking my relationship with them...I live by that rule.

I swear like a sailor with my friends and coworkers, but not with my family.
psasser
on 03/27/15
NicoWinch liked this  
But if you go to someone's home and swear like that in front of their kids, they may well ask you to leave. So if you board a Southwest Airlines plane, you have to respect their house rules as well.
suzannelagerman
on 03/27/15
He could just turn the shirt inside out and get on the flight.
GlorysAunt
on 03/27/15
osbornc01 liked this  
I opted for the 3rd choice,I can't say passengers should be able to wear whatever they want, that's too open ended, but I don't think this is that big of a deal
rabbott
on 03/27/15
I would have told him to stick duct tape over the word, grow up & get on the plane.
I have seen them do the same thing with females wearing shirts too skimpy.

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